Garrido Coffee

Part 2, Achieving a 96 Score

by Keith Agoada

Garrido Coffee
Garrido Coffee

After finishing my tour of the Geisha farm, it was now time to do a cupping of their different lots, and blends.

Garrido has a cupping room where they have artisanal small-scale roasting. On a large round table eight different roasted beans are lined up in glass containers. One by one the beans are ground and then top down poured.

First we start with the Geisha - Caturra blends, which are said to be around 88-89 scores. We grab our metal spoon and sip loudly, oxygenating the liquid embracing the experience in full. I take note of the smells, taste, and overall experience. The 88 score blend had a light floral fragrance and a mellow coffee flavor. While delicious, I had tried coffees before in that range.

Garrido Coffee

As we advanced around the table, sampling the other varieties, we went up on scoring. The flavors got increasingly fragrant with a range of floral, and fruity notes that hit on different areas of the palette.

As a novice to world class coffee I was in complete shock that as we got to 94 scores and up, the coffee literally tasted like fruits. The 94 score resembled pineapple, and the 96 score coffee was as if I had drank a cup of ripe wild blueberries.

Garrido's coffee is available wholesale in small batches green and is shipped to exquisite coffee purveyors in major metropolitan areas around the world.

I learned in this experience that fine coffee is in many ways like fine wine. From the growing, to processing, to pouring, to tasting, there is a deep culture and every detail makes a difference as you transcend from a score in the mid to high 80s (considered high quality) up into the 90s.

Garrido Coffee

Garrido, Panama Geisha Coffee, Part 1
by Keith Agoada

Having spent the last six years visiting with farmers in Latin America I have consistently been offered to buy bulk green conventional and organic coffee. Most of the time I simply respond that coffee is its own beast, and I stick to the fruits. But, given the coffee culture in Boquete, Panama I decided to take a deeper look.